Insights from a Social Media Beauty Influencer

Michelle, of @allthingsbeautymichelles on Instagram, is a 20-year-old beauty blogger from Sydney, Australia. She is currently a full-time university student, works casually, and is a beauty influencer on Instagram, WordPress, and YouTube. She has kindly agreed to provide an insight into the life of a Social Media Beauty Influencer.

It is clear Michelle has dedicated a substantial amount of time and effort into maintaining a professional-looking beauty account on Instagram.13393068_1702643193329888_1338657446_n.jpg

She says that each photo takes different amounts of time to create, with a single product shot taking only a few minutes to capture and edit, and a group photo of one or more products taking up to ten minutes including editing. Because of her work, Michelle has been approached by companies to try or feature their products.
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She doesn’t currently charge companies for her posts, but has been exploited in the past by a well-known cosmetics company, who used her photo with out giving her credit. This is an issue, especially for small-to-medium beauty accounts, as companies ignorantly believe they are entitled to use photos they come across without adhering to the Instagram etiquette of giving credit for the use of a photo. Michelle says as long as she is always awarded credit for her work, she is happy for others to use her images. Michelle enjoys the glamorous opportunities she has had as a beauty blogger/ Instagrammer, such as the events and free products! She feels blessed to be have been able to attend two Bloggers United Australia events, and she has received products to review from multiple companies.

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As a beauty blogger, Michelle has had the opportunity to meet new friends and interact with companies. This photo was taken at an event hosted by Bloggers United Australia.

Michelle has not encountered many negative aspects as a beauty blogger/ Instagrammer. She said that this begun as a hobby and as soon as it makes her unhappy she will stop. However, she has had some anxiety and loss of sleep due to product photo’s not working. For example, when she was sent a skin care range that she was asked to review on her Instagram, the products they cast shadows when she took pictures, which did not live up to the quality/standard of work she maintains on her page.

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There is a degree of quality and professionalism expected of beauty influencers, especially on Instagram.

I would like to thank Michelle for her first-hand insight and contribution to this post.

 

All images in this post were given to me by the photographer and used with their permission.

 

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The Challenges Faced by Aspiring Social Media Beauty Influencers

Jeffree Star, Jaclyn Hill, KathleenLights, and Manny Mua have achieved great successful from their YouTube careers, and this ‘rise from obscurity to pop-culture stardom is hardly unique on YouTube’ (D’Souza, 2015). However, it is uncommon. Unfortunately, many, often deserving, YouTube and Instagram personalities will never achieve this status (D’Souza, 2015).

For many, YouTube is capable of providing sustainable full-time careers. Majority of YouTubers make a lot of their money from the advertising sold on their channels, which increases with the number of subscribers (D’Souza, 2015). Billions of dollars are spent each year on advertising on YouTube, allowing creators to generate an income. However, generating a consistent revenue from YouTube, let alone securing business opportunities as Jeffree, Jaclyn, Kathleen, and Manny have, is much more challenging, and accomplished by only a very small percentage of YouTubers. This is a consequence of the number of major challenges faced when trying to make a full-time career on social media. The first challenge faced by those trying to establish a career as a full-time social media beauty guru is the extremely competitive nature of the industry. There is over 14.9 billion beauty-related video views on YouTube, of which 97% are generated by the 45,000 beauty-focused personalities on YouTube. The second challenge is getting your content noticed. The reality is that most videos on YouTube get little to no attention. The third challenged faced by YouTubers is that these content creators only ever see a small portion of what advertisers pay. Even though billions of dollars are spent each year on YouTube, YouTubers  have to accumulate a substantial number of subscribers and views before they see that money. Another challenge to that pertains to achieving success on social media as a beauty influencer is the perpetuation of conventional beauty standards and status symbols. As observed by Alice Marwick (2015, p.139), ‘While Instagram makes it possible for “regular people” to attract the mass audiences historically limited to broadcast media, the Instafamous tend to be conventionally good-looking, work in “cool” industries… and emulate the tropes and symbols of traditional celebrity culture, such as glamorous self-portraits, designer goods, or luxury cars’.

Aside from the monetary challenges of sustaining a career as a full-time social media beauty influencer, many people often underestimate the time and energy devoted to achieving a successful career in the industry.

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It can take a great deal of time to orchestrate, photograph, edit, and upload one photo to Instagram.

From my experience as an aspiring beauty influencer on YouTube and Instagram, the time and energy to set up, film or photograph, edit, and promote my work can be exhausting, and I only do this as a hobby.

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It often takes great effort and professionalism on the part of beauty influencers to create content that encourages a loyal following.

Currently, I am not paid for my work, I do it simply because I find it enjoyable, but this means having to fit it in between a part-time job and two university degrees. From meeting others with the same aspirations, through YouTube and Instagram, this is the case for many aspiring beauty influencers.

Unfortunately, many social media beauty influencers will never reach the same status as the likes of Jeffree Star, Jaclyn Kill, KathleenLights, and Manny Mua. However, it is still a rewarding career, and hobby, for many people. If you would like to gain an insight into the life of an aspiring Social Media Beauty Influencer than read my following post, in which I have interviewed Michelle, of @allthingsbeautymichelles on Instagram, on her experiences.

 

All photos used are my own.

Reference List

D’Souza, K 2015, ‘Move over Hollywood, this is the age of the YouTube star’, San Jose Mercury News, 13 October.

Marwick, A. E. 2015, ‘Instafame: Luxury Selfies in the Attention Economy’, Public Culture, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 137-160.

The Reality of Life as a Social Media Beauty Influencer

Since the development of Web 2.0, a new industry has been created which has generated numerous jobs. These jobs involved the development and creation of new software, platforms and apps that gave life to the social media era. With the cultural significance of Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter and YouTube, people are now making full time careers out of living their lives and developing their passions on these social media platforms. As an avid social media user and aspiring beauty influencer on YouTube and Instagram I am interested in researching this emerging profession and the opportunities it has to offer. As ‘YouTuber’ and ‘Instagrammer’ are now part- or full-time occupations, I have conducted research into the reality of the quality of life of social media beauty influencers, or ‘gurus’, and I will be presenting my findings through a blog series.

A beauty influencer is a person who, through their social media presence, has the power to affect the purchase decisions of others because of their knowledge of makeup and beauty-related topics. The term ‘Beauty Guru’ is often used to describe YouTubers and Instagrammers who have extensive knowledge about makeup and beauty-related products and application techniques (Rainnie, 2015). The term is often used to describe those who may or may not have received formal training (Rainnie, 2015).

Vlogging is a contraction of the term ‘video blogging’, and ‘vloggers’ are people who actively participate in vlogging (Rainnie, 2015). Vloggers film themselves and share their ‘vlogs’ across Web 2.0 platforms, most commonly uploading to the social media site, YouTube (O’Reilly, 2005; cited in Rainnie, 2015). Vloggers who operate predominantly on YouTube are often titled ‘YouTubers’ (Rainnie, 2015). Influencers who operate predominantly on Instagram will be referred to as ‘Instagrammers’. I have chosen to make YouTube and Instagram the focus of my social media research for a number of reasons: my familiarity with the platforms, their strength as social media platforms for beauty influencers, and the fact that many influencers who have YouTube channels also have Instagram accounts, and vise versa.

The YouTube beauty gurus I will discussing in this series have accumulated a significant following. For the purpose of this blog series, the term ‘significant’ when used to describe a YouTube following will refer to a YouTuber who has accumulated a following greater than 1,000,000 subscribers. YouTube has over one billion users, and as of April, 2016, there are only two thousand channels with seven-figure subscriber counts. This is an incredible achievement and a milestone that is acknowledged by the YouTube organisation and commemorated by awarding the YouTuber with a Gold Play Button.

Instagram also hosts numerous beauty-related accounts, that have helped a number of influences achieve ‘Instafame’, ‘the condition of having a relatively great number of followers on the app’ (Markwick, 2015, p.137).

If you too are interested in the glamorous opportunities and the unexpected reality of this emerging industry, then make sure to check out the other blog posts in this series.

Reference List

Rainnie, E 2015, ‘Persona and Parataxis: YouTube and the Rise of the Beauty Guru’, Bachelor of Communications and Media Studies (Honours), University of Wollongong, Wollongong.

Marwick, A. E. 2015, ‘Instafame: Luxury Selfies in the Attention Economy’, Public Culture, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 137-160.